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RCMP investigates fatal motorcycle crash

TATAMAGOUCHE – Colchester County RCMP were at the scene of a fatal motorcycle crash that occurred on Main Street earlier this morning.
At approximately 4:45 a.m., RCMP, EHS and Tatamagouche Fire Department responded to a report of a motorcycle crash involving a lone rider. Preliminary investigation determined that the male rider was travelling westbound on Highway 6 when he lost control of his vehicle near the Main Street intersection.
The 24-year-old Tatamagouche man, who was found in a driveway, was pronounced deceased at the scene.
An RCMP traffic analyst assisted the  investigators at the scene.

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Pristine Kids newest venture of online fundraising platform

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article is a part of a new segment featuring fundraising campaigns in Pictou County that use the online platform of www.gofundme.com to raise money for a variety of different causes. If you know of a campaign that you would like to have featured in this series email heatherbrimicombe@pictouadvocate.com.

 

If you think back to being about 10 or 11, allowance money was a precious thing. Chore money was earned and saved for the things you wanted most.
For kids who want to skateboard, a proper deck and all the fittings can be a big investment, with a professional board ranging from about $100 plus.
A local skateboarding startup has taken up the cause of helping kids who are interested in skateboarding.
Pristine Skateboarding, which began in February of this year by some Pictou County locals, has started a fundraising campaign to provide kids ages 15 and under with professional skateboards to promote the sport and physical activity for kids who may not be able to afford a proper board otherwise.
“It was just an idea I got…Kids can’t get a job, they’re too young,” said Brandon Richardson, one of the founders of Pristine Skateboarding. “So how can we help them?”
After discussions with HAF skateboarding shop and agreeing to put in their own skateboard decks at cost, Pristine founded Pristine Kids.
Richardson said that in the last few years, he has noticed a growth in the Pictou County skateboarding community, as well as noticing that some of the younger kids are using skateboards from department stores or other places, that may not be up to the calibre of boarding they are hoping to do.
“You can break a board so easily, it’s just a piece of wood,” said Richardson. “To go to a shop and spend 70 or 80 bucks on even just a deck when you’re 10 years old, it takes a year to do that kind of thing.”
After rounding up funding for the project, which is being crowd sourced, the organization will purchase professional quality skateboards for kids 15 and under.
“The better we do the more we’ll hand out,” said Richardson.
So far, Pristine Skateboarding has been promoting the initiative on their Facebook page, Pristine Skateboarding, as well as collecting funding via a Go Fund Me page.
To donate to the cause, visit http://www.gofundme.com/PristineKids or donate using Paypal by sending a “gift” to pristineskateboarding@outlook.com. Richardson also mentioned that those who are uncomfortable donating via the Internet can get in touch with him on Facebook.
According to Richardson, boards can range anywhere from $100 to $250 or more, so they are hoping to raise enough to give a few away.
“A lot of people are pumped,” said Richardson about feedback they have been receiving on the campaign so far. “If it goes well we want to do it as a continuous thing.”
Richardson hopes that along with promoting the sport itself, that getting kids interested in skateboarding will also help with personal development.
“I find skateboarding is such a mental therapy; it’s helped me through a lot so if it can help me it can help kids, it can help anybody,” said Richardson. “It can help them help themselves.”

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Run for the Lobster set for Sunday

PICTOU – The annual Run for the Lobster is the next event on the Johnny Miles Stay Active Series.
The Shiretown Dental Clinic five-km and 10-km races will take place on Sunday.
Participants can register online at www.raceroster.ca or on site from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at the Advocate Printing parking lot on Browns Point Road, where each race starts and finishes.
Registration fee is $30 and $27 for Run Nova Scotia members.
The race kit includes a computerized chip timing chip, personalized race bibs, dry fit running shirt, finishing medals for the first 350 runners, refreshments as well as post race snacks compliments of Subway.
There will also be a student challenge, which is free for students 16 and under. There is a limit of 100 students. The student challenge race kit includes bib, official race hat, finishing medals, refreshments as well as a post race snacks.
In keeping with the run for fun concept the student challenge is non-timed event.
The course will be a one-or two-loop course from the parking lot, right on Haliburton Road, right on West River Road, left on Church Street, right on Coleraine Street, right on Water Street, left on Caladh Avenue, right onto to the Jitney Trail and back to the Advocate where runners will be directed to do a small “switchback” to make up the distances for each event.
Runners will do one loop for the 5-K and two loops for the 10-K..

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Brittany Fraser rides at ‘15 Pan Am Games

PLYMOUTH – Hard work has paid off for a Pictou County athlete and her equestrian partner.
Brittany Fraser will be riding her 10-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding, All In, during the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto.
Fraser is a member of Canada’s host dressage team that will compete on July 11 and 12.
“It’s very exciting,” she said from New York, where she finished training last week with her coach, four-time Canadian Olympian Ashley Holzer. “I do love it. I’ve put a lot of work into this. It takes a lot of time and a lot of commitment but it pays off in the end.”
Now 26, Fraser has been horse riding since she was four. Her training included nearly six months in Florida from November the April before Pan Am qualifiers through May and the month of June in New York.
Her father Craig Fraser purchased her current mount in 2010, and she feels fortunate to be one with her horse during training and competition.
“I’m so lucky to have such a supportive family and coach,” she said.
Competitive equestrian horses tend to be elderly, as young as nine and as old as 16, she said.
“We have a real partnership,” she said. “They’re very fragile animals but if you keep them healthy they’ll last a while.”
Fraser is trying hard to live in the moment and enjoy the Pan Ams, especially with them in Toronto where she’s based. But a good showing this year means a possible trip to the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
“That’s the next thing on the agenda,” she said.
She hopes to return to Pictou County at the end of this month.

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Fan support points to card next year

PICTOU – A pro wrestling card that is among events featured by the Pictou Lobster Carnival committee appears to be a go for 2016.
The committee offered a card on June 11 at Hector Arena, and organizers were elated with the nearly 400 fans who attended.
“We had an attendance of over 365 people, Ryan Mader said. “I was impressed with how welcome the (fans) made the wrestlers feel and how much noise they made. Wrestling will most definitely return next year, barring any unforeseen circumstances.”
Mader wrestles under the name of Lincoln Steen and was one of the wrestlers on the card, along with the American Patriot. Mader was in the third match wrestling against Kilgrave, whose menacing gestures drew more humour than fear from the many youngsters at the event.
Kowboy Mike Hughes from Stratford, P.E.I., who received a trophy after he was declared overall champion for the night, said he was pleased with how Mader helped to promote the event.
The wrestling card was among events the committee scheduled over the year to profile the festival leading to the actual carnival that this year takes place from July 10 to 12.
Carnival committee chairman Shawn McNamara said the card kept the carnival in the minds of residents, while also adding revenue to the committee’s coffers.

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Y program presents athletes with certificates

Athletes who are members of the Shotokai karate program at the Pictou County YMCA were rewarded with certificates during a recent event that also includes some demonstrations.
The certificates and belts presented on June 14 recognized the members’ development as they learn martial arts during the season-ending event at the Y gym.
The Shotokai karate program, which is available to everyone and is included in the Y membership, will resume in September.
Bob Bennett leads the program with the help of numerous volunteers.
Bennett, who has been the head coach for 30 years with the Pictou County YMCA , instructs the more than 40 kids and 12 adult members in what is called Karate Do Shotokai.
He has taught more than 2,500 athletes over that time.
The karate program is among many that have transferred from the Y’s previous location in New Glasgow.
Bennett sees the program as a way for youngsters to learn a martial art and to become more well-rounded people from the way they interact with others.

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A positive attitude no matter the role

When Steve Goodwin called a couple weeks ago and asked if I would write a column for The Advocate’s advance coverage of the Johnny Miles Marathon, it was easy to say yes. Given the option to focus on whatever aspect I chose, I decided to address the man himself. Johnny Miles was always easy to write about.
But there was someone else I considered, too: George Manos.
He’s someone I’ve known since childhood. We were kids growing up around the corner from each other in New Glasgow. In high school, I knew him as an athlete when he was excelling in rugby, basketball, curling and tumbling. I knew him later when, early in his teaching career, he turned to coaching, and later I was watching as he became what I would call the ideal volunteer.
Yes, George Manos did all those things.
He’s not a kid anymore. This year, he turned 78, most of those almost eight decades filled with sports activities. Yet there was room for more. He became a politician at the local level – a part of his life that wasn’t hard to understand. He had graduated from NGHS with a future premier, John Hamm, and attended St. Francis Xavier University with a future prime minister, Brian Mulroney. No, the political influences weren’t far from him.
But I can’t reminisce about George without emphasizing his time with the marathon.
His association with the event began at the start, in 1975 when New Glasgow was celebrating its centennial and the marathon was considered a one-time event, a headliner for the big birthday. When he climbed aboard, he was like the others. It was a one-year deal, a quick way to give a little back to the community.
Johnny Williston, the doctor who was working hard to make the 1975 marathon a success, knocked on George’s door. He was looking for someone to be a timing judge. Manos agreed to take it on. Heck, it was only a one-time event. It wasn’t hard to work that into his schedule.
What a difference a year made. In 1976, with a second marathon already confirmed, Williston was back, this time asking George to take on the chairmanship. Williston wasn’t leaving until George said yes. After a prolonged discussion, he said yes.
The ’76 marathon was another success and, not surprisingly, Williston wasn’t going to stop there. Neither was Manos. He, too, was in for the long haul.
Other events were added and, for a while, the full marathon was dropped, returning in time to celebrate its 20th anniversary. All the while, Manos was chairman.
In 1976, he took on the chairmanship for that one year. In 2000, after 25 years in the position, George felt it was time to step aside, allowing Terry Curley to replace him.
What kept Manos around so long?
I’m convinced it was because he had the same positive attitude that kept him in education for a long and distinguished career. The same positive attitude I saw in him when he was participating in all those school sports.
The same positive attitude he displayed while coaching high school rugby, high school basketball and junior high hockey while teaching science and math at the junior high level. The same positive attitude he had while serving for a decade on New Glasgow’s town council.
The George Manos we saw at New Glasgow High was one of those fellows you liked to cheer for, liked to see doing well. No question he remained that good guy in everything he did.
Like myself in those high school days, George was inspired by our athletic director, the late John (Brother) MacDonald, a man who influenced so many of us in those days, a man who kept his interest in us long after we graduated. George agrees on that 100 per cent.
So it was no surprise when Manos took on various coaching positions in his teaching years. He loved the camaraderie around sports. For him, it wasn’t added work; it was fun.
Anytime George and I chatted about his career, my own career, sports in general, that positive attitude was openly displayed. He considered his coaching as time well spent, believing teachers should take on sports, drama, whatever would give them additional experiences with students.
I’m sure young people growing up in Stellarton considered themselves lucky to have him as part of their educational experience. He taught grade seven at A.G. Baillie, later serving as the school’s principal. In subsequent years, he was principal of the junior high. In his final years before retirement in 1992, he was supervisor of adult education in the Pictou District School Board’s central office.
Oh, lest I forget, he somehow found time to volunteer as an instructor in the fitness program at the YMCA for 22 years.
I love the story about his getting into politics. With no experience whatsoever, he ran for the seat on town council – another way, he once told me, to give something back. This quote he gave me years ago was hard to forget: “I was a complete greenhorn. I hadn’t a clue what I was doing. I didn’t canvass. I didn’t do anything.”
Nevertheless, he got elected and held the seat for 10 years. Like all the other responsibilities in his life, he loved it. Too bad all politicians weren’t like him.
You’d think, with all those aspects to his life, he wouldn’t have had time for family. Far from it. He has been married to Shirley for 55 years, they raised three daughters and a son, and the number of grandchildren has run into double figures.
George and Shirley, I understand, have recently sold their New Glasgow home and moved to a new complex in town. Here’s hoping, from an old friend, that they have many more years together to enjoy the fruits of their labour.

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Fit Chix eye Mud Hero event

PLYMOUTH – They call themselves the Down ‘n’ Dirty Fit Chix.
They’re all at least 60 years old, and they are in scary physical and mental condition.
Instructor Cheryl Lays will be accompanied by Ruth Thompson, Susan Lindblad and Dorothy Benoit at the OCR Canada sanctioned obstacle course racing Mud Hero event on Saturday at Ski Martock.
It is billed as the Maritimes’ largest obstacle event.
It’s also the first time for all of them.
“And it won’t be out last,” assured Lays, who has been a fitness trainer for nearly 30 years.
At 61, Benoit is the foursome’s youngest competitor. Lindblad is 63, Lays is 67 and Thompson is 73. They train regularly at the community centre in Plymouth, using weights, steps and training balls during a regimen that Lay said can intimidate much younger athletes.
Their level of conditioning is exceeded by their camaraderie. They’ve trained in Plymouth since 2010.
“These girls are fit, and they’re so dedicated,” Lays said. “I want to work hard so I want them to work hard. I’d like to put 20-year-olds in here with them.”
Lindblad has “started and stopped” hard fitness exercising for years, then got back to it in earnest 20 years ago.
Benoit said she looks forward to the workouts with Lays and her other teammates.
“Cheryl is a wonder fitness instructor,” she said. “I could be tired at home, but I feel great when I’m here. The wellness you feel, the strength you have – this is a wonderful place to be.”
Thompson said she feels blessed to be training with Lays and her teammates.
“I like the companionship,” she said. “I’m in better shape training with Cheryl than I have my entire life.”
Lays has a family connection that has driven her and her teammates to Mud Hero and other OCR events.
Her daughter Cynthia, who describes OCR as an emerging extreme sport, competed on June 6 at a Spartan event at Ski Wentworth.
“An OCR can be fun,” she said, while alluding to the advantage it has as a means to raise funds for various charities. “It can also be a competition of the fittest, fastest, strongest athletes in the world.”
She said the Spartans group she belongs to and others would like to see OCR become an Olympic event.
For now, Cynthia has her sights on an official OCR world championship taking place in October in Ohio.
“Anyone can do an OCR, able-bodied and disabled alike,” she said. “Many obstacle course races offer children’s races and some even offer a canine division where you can do the course with your favourite dog.”
Races can range in length between three and 42 kilometres. Obstacles can include climbing a four-foot wall. Others have walls up to 10 feet high. There’s crawling in mud, under barbed wire, stretching bungee cords and jumping.
“The race waivers are quick to identify that the risks of injury are high and the participants need to be aware of them, but for the most part OCRs are not that dangerous,” she said. “You will accomplish things that you didn’t know you were capable of, at least that has been my experience for the past three seasons.”

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Lindy Quann wins top prizes at Pictou Academy

Thirteen years spent in Pictou schools culminated Friday night as 33 students graduated from Pictou Academy.
Class valedictorian Ashtyn Pires told her fellow grads and all who gathered to witness the convocation ceremony held at the deCoste Entertainment Centre: “We put in blood, sweat and tears but in the end, really learned what accomplishment felt like… through all of this, it has shaped each and every individual here.”
Lindy Quann was the big winner of the night, taking home the majority of prizes and medals.
Among the many awards she received were four medals: Town of Pictou Gold Medal, Queen Elizabeth II Medal, Governor General Medal and the Tupper Gold Medal.
Quann was also the recipient of: Ethel A. Harris Scholarship; Maude Sutherland Bursary; McLure Bursary; W.T. Ferguson Bursary; MacKenzie Bursary; C.B. Robinson Prize; Crerar MacDonald Bursary; Dr. Mary MacKenzie Smith Scholarship; Robert Kennedy Memorial Bursary.
She won Edna Sproull Williams Awards for highest marks in subjects: Highest Standing Girl in English 12, Highest Physics 12, Second Highest in PreCalculus Math 12.
Quann also received: MacIntosh, MacDonnell and MacDonald Scholarship, Caribou Womens Institute Award, Pictou Lions Club Award, Sutherland Harris Memorial Hospital Foundation Health and Wellness Scholarship, Stephen Russell Memorial Prize, Pictou District Womens Institute Bursary; Fisher Bursaries; Heighton Memorial Bursary and Pictou County Heart & Stroke Foundation Bursary.
Also taking home some hardware was Silver Medalist Craig Sutherland. He also won the Ian Wisener Memorial Trophy (Athletics, Leadership and Scholarship).
Sutherland was also the recipient of: David George Johnson Memorial Award; Gordon Bursary; Robert and Catherine Ross Memorial Bursary; Rev. A.A. Smith Scholarship; Fisher Bursaries; Clarence Wong Memorial Bursary.
He also won Edna Sproull Williams Awards for highest standings in subjects: Highest Standing Boy in HGS 12, Highest in PreCalculus Math 12, Second Highest in Biology 12 and Second Highest in Physics 12.
Among the Community Organization prizes he earned were: The Fraser and Hoyt Good Citizenship Award, Sutherland Harris Memorial Hospital Foundation Health and Wellness Scholarship, Stephen Russell Memorial Prize.
Quann and Sutherland also each won a Scammell Bursary, each valued at $10,000, to attend university.
Scammell Bursaries each valued at $2,500 were awarded to Emily MacDonald and Emma Rose.
MacDonald Bursaries, each valued at $1,250, were awarded to Madison Murray and Bhreagh MacMillan.
Chester and Barb Roach Memorial Scholarships ($2,000 renewable for up to three years) went to Kenzie MacDonald (2013), Kristen MacKinnon (2014), Kristin Haley and Josh Larade.
Additional PAEF Awards and recipients included:
Kevin Gillis Memorial Award: Damian MacCallum
Miss Mary MacKay award and E.M. MacDonald Award: Rikki Stevens
Donald Blenkhorne Bursary: Josh MacLean
Patterson Bursary: Emma Rose
Frank I. Huelin Scholarship: Connor MacLeod
Claude J.W. Kedy Award: Jared Green
William H. Harris Bursary: Kristin Haley
Heighton Memorial Bursary: Emily MacDonald
Mary Osmond Memorial Bursary: Maria Hamilton
Purves Loagie Bursary: Bhreagh MacMillan
PAEF Achievement Awards were received by: Michael Murray, Ben Murray, Trevor Howard, Jordan Gaudet, Megan Davey, Dylan Maybe, Dillan Corbett, Chance MacDonald, Brandon MacRae, Robbie David, Nathan Langille, Cassandra Rhynold, James Pellerine and Brandon Rankin.
Other recipients of Edna Sproull Williams Awards for Subjects were: Highest in Math (academic) 12: Logan MacDonald; Highest in GGS 12: Maria Hamilton; Highest in Law 12: Emily MacDonald; Second Highest in French 12: Emily MacDonald; Second Highest in Academic Math 12: Jared Green; Second Highest in GGS 12: Damian MacCallum; Second Highest in Chemistry 12: Emma Rose; Second Highest in Law 12: Rikki Stevens.
Community Organization prizes also went to: New Caledonia Lodge #11 Freemasons Bursaries: Bhreagh MacMillan and Rikki Stevens. Shiretown Dental Bursaries: Emily MacDonald and Maddy Murray. The Rotary Club of Pictou Award: Emily MacDonald. Mahar Memorial Scholarship: Josh Larade. Pictou Academy Alumni Staff Bursary: Damian MacCallum. Sobey Scholarship: Josh Larade. Canadian Legion Branch 16 Scholarship: Alisha MacNeill. Monarchist League of Canada-Northumberland Branch: Brandon Rankin. Grant Thornton Accountants Prize: Jesse Hughes. Pictou Lions Club Awards: Lindy Quann and Jesse Hughes. Princess Rebekah Lodge #4 Award: Emma Rose. Nova Scotia Teachers Union Bursary: Logan MacDonald. Pictou West Liberal Association: Maddy Murray. Grohmann Knives Ltd Award: Josh MacLean. Pictou West Conservative Association Award: Ashtyn Pires. United Commercial Travellers Pictonian Council #879 Bursary: Emma Rose. No More Westrays Bursary: Connor MacLeod. Pictou Garden Club Prize: Bhreagh MacMillan. School Administrators Association Award: Alisha MacNeill. RBC Foundation Bursary: Bhreagh MacMillan. Bergengren Credit Union Bursary: Emma Rose. Glen Haven Manor High School Bursary: Jared Green. Pictou Centre PC Womens Assoc. Prize: Victoria MacDonald. Grohmann, Sachs and Babinec Family Bursary as well as Murphy-Ryan Bursary and the Crews Family Bursary: Josh Larade. Wyatt MacPhail Memorial Bursary: Josh MacLean. CUPE Local 089 Bursary: Emily MacDonald. CUPW Local 087: Bhreagh MacMillan. McDonalds Restaurant Bursary: Ashtyn Pires.

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Hannah Greene double-medal winner at NNEC

Hannah Greene was a double-medal winner at the graduation ceremony for North Nova Education Centre Friday night, held at the Wellness Centre.
She won the Governor General’s Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Medal. The Governor General Medal recognizes the highest academic standing in all Grade 11 and 12 courses. The Queen Elizabeth II Medal is awarded to the student who earned the highest cumulative over their three years at NNEC.
She graduated with First Class Honours. She plans to attend St. Francis Xavier University and has received a renewable Bank of Montreal Scholarship valued at $20,000 over four years, the Carmichael Scholarship valued at $6,000 over four years, the Michelin Bursary Award for Scholastic Excellence valued at $2,000 and the Exercise Science 12 and Biology 12 subject prizes.
The Scholars’ Society is a tradition at North Nova which was created to honor those students who achieve a high level of academic success. Students who have a cumulative average of 90 per cent over their three years at NNEC have their names inscribed on the Scholars’ Society wall at North Nova and have had their names entered into a draw for a $1,000 bursary from Scotiabank, the presenting sponsor. The winner was Kim Cormier.
Among the other graduates and the honours they received were:
Natalie Christine Addison, Honours. She was awarded a Nova Scotia Teachers’ Union – Pictou Local Education Bursary valued at $500.
Brandon Leslie Baglole – Honours.
Gabrielle Nichole Bailey, Honours. She was awarded a $350 entrance scholarship to Acadia University and a renewable scholarship valued at $2,600 over four years. She was also the recipient of the Economics 11 subject prize.
Aidan Felipe Brand Balignasay, Honours. He was the recipient of a $1,250 Harrison McCain Bursary, the Joe Dungale Memorial award valued at $100, the Canadian Union of Postal Workers Local #87 Award of $200 and the Pictou County Heart and Stroke Support Group Bursary of $200.
Kourtney Dawn Barker – Honours. She was the recipient of the English Communications 12 subject prize.
Dylan Trevor Bennett – Principal’s List.
Christian Gregory Bezanson – Honours. He was awarded a renewable Achievement Award at St. Thomas University valued at $4,000 over four years, a residence bursary valued at $7,500 and a Millennium entrance bursary valued at $2,000.
Olivia Jan Bezanson – Honours.
Kennedy Victoria Bourque – Principal’s List. She was been awarded the CUPE Local #3890 Bursary valued at $750.
Mary Elizabeth Brewer – Principal’s List. She was the recipient of the Blaine MacLane Excavation Bursary valued at $500 and the Geology 12 CEP subject prize.
Christopher David Brooker – Honours.
Cynthia-Therese Colquhoun Brown – Honours. She was awarded the Pictou Centre PC Women’s Association Prize valued at $100.
Daniel Jacob Bugden – Principal’s List.
Duncan Adam Byrne – Honours. He was awarded an $8,000 entrance scholarship to Mount Allison University, the MacDonald Chisholm Trask Insurance Bursary valued at $250 and the Pepsi Bottling Group Limited Bursary valued at $100.
Ethan MacKenzie Caldwell – Principal’s List. He was the recipient of the Principal’s Award for Excellence valued at $100 and the Home Trades Technology 12 subject prize.
Colton Alexander Cameron, recipient of a Nova Scotia/Nunavut Command Royal Canadian Legion bursary valued at $500.
Corinne Isabel Cameron – Principal’s List.
Jack Antony Casey – Honours. He was awarded a Renewable Achievement Award valued at $4,000 over four years and a Nova Scotia Freemason’s Bursary – Hudson Lodge #77 valued at $500. He was also the recipient of the Jean Whidden Memorial Scholarship valued at $500, the Northern Nova United Soccer Club Bursary valued at $100 and the English 12 African Heritage subject prize.
Kayla Jade Gloria Clark – Honours. She was awarded a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University valued at $7,000 over four years and the CUPE Local #8920 Bursary valued at $500.
Dakota Alexander Clements – French Immersion.
Logan Taylor Clements – Principal’s List.
Christopher Charles Cole – Honours. He was awarded a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Mary’s University valued at $4,000 over four years and the Golden Link Rebekah Lodge #2 award valued at $50.
Hailey Morgan Conley – Honours.
Josie Lynn Coolen – Principal’s List; recipient of the Ivan MacInnis Memorial Bursary valued at $70.
Jessica Anne Cormier – Honours.
Kimberly Jane Cormier – First Class Honours. She was awarded an entrance scholarship to Acadia University valued at $8,250; a Bank of Montreal Scholarship valued at $1,000; the Joan Eileen Porter Advanced Placement English 12 Bursary valued at $500 and the North Nova Music Auxiliary Award valued at $500. She was also the recipient of the Carmichael Scholarship valued at $6,000 over four years, the Music Instrumental band 12, the Advanced Music 12, and the Mathematics 12 subject prizes.
Lane Brian Andrew Cormier – Honours.
Bailey Zachery Crawly – Principal’s List.
Brianna Renee Cromwell – Honours. She was the recipient of the Making a Difference Award valued at $250, the Principal’s Recognition Medal and the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #34 New Glasgow Bursary valued at $800.
Austin Riley d’Entremont – Honours; recipient of the New Glasgow High School Class of 1982 award.
Celsea Danielle Davis – Principal’s List.
Michaela Marie Dawne Dean – Principal’s List; the Pictou County School Administrator Association Bursary valued at $200.
Noah Keighan Delorey – Principal’s List.
Tracey Suzanne Denny – Principal’s List – French Immersion; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Mary’s University valued at $4,000 over four years. She was also the recipient of the Mi’kmawey Spirit Award valued at $100.
Blair Nelson Dewtie – Honours. He was awarded a renewable entrance scholarship to St. FXU valued at $5,000 over four years. He has also received a $1,000 Nova Scotia Eastlink Major Midget Hockey League Bursary, a $500 East Coast Ice Jam Tournament Award, the Colin B. MacGillivary Athletic/Academic Award valued at $1,000, the Hugh MacLean Knights of Columbus #1667 Memorial Bursary valued at $250 and the UCT Pictonian Council #879 Bursary valued at $500.
Cameron Warrick Dicks – Honours.
Marisa Ann Doreleyers – Principal’s List.
Carson Bradley Dunbar – Principal’s List
Daniel Jeffery Dunlop – Honours.
Matthew Joseph Dunlop – Honours. He received a $4,500 scholarship to University of King’s College, the North Nova Staff Bursary valued at $100 and the Music 12 subject prize.
Evan David Dwyer – Honours.
Sarah Danielle English – First Class Honours. She received a Gold Scholarship valued at $16,000, the Principal’s Recognition Medal, the Pictou East PC Association Prize valued at $200, the Charles Ward Memorial Bursary valued at $500, the Michelin Bursary Award for Scholastic Excellence valued at $2,000 and the North Nova Music Auxiliary Award valued at $500.
Dakoda Vernon James Falcitelli – Honours; the Hugh MacLean Knights of Columbus #1667 Memorial Bursary valued at $250.
Taylor Lane Falcitelli – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University valued at $5,000 over four years. She has also received a Nova Scotia Nurses’ Union Bursary valued at $500, the Hugh MacLean Knights of Columbus #1667 Memorial Bursary valued at $250, the Visual Arts 12 subject prize, and the 2015 Angus B. Armour Memorial Scholarship valued at $1,500.
Liam Michael Farrell – First Class Honours; recipient of a renewable Merit Scholarship valued at $12,000 over four years, the Frank E. Milne scholarship valued at $4,000 over four years and the Scotsburn Co-operative Bursary valued at $200. Liam has also received the Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12, the Advanced Placement Chemistry 12, the Calculus 12 and the Physics 12 subject prizes and the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #29 Trenton Bursary valued at $800.
Lindsay Anne Feit – Honours.
Chelsea Anne Feltmate – Honours; a renewable entrance award to St. Thomas University valued at $4,000 over four years. She was also the recipient of a Nova Scotia Freemason’s Bursary – Hudson Lodge #77 valued at $500, the Psychology 12 subject prize, and the Principal’s Award for Excellence valued at $100.
Paige Marie Feltmate – Honours. She received a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University valued at $7,000 over four years; a Nova Scotia Freemason’s Hudson Lodge #77 Bursary valued at $500 and the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #34 New Glasgow Bursary valued at $800.
Joshua Courage Fifield – First Class Honours; recipient of the Joan Eileen Porter Memorial Bursary valued at $750, the Drama 12 Theatre Arts subject prize and the Mac, Mac, & Mac Law Offices leadership Prize valued at $300.
Marshall Patrick Levi Fitt – Principal’s List; recipient of a Municipal Council Bursary valued at $200.
Madison Erin Fleet – Principal’s List.
Daniel John Forrest – Principal’s List.
Shaynea-Lee Nicole Forsyth – Principal’s List.
Rylee Paige Fraser – Honours.
Alyson Jean Lorraine Fulton – Honours; entrance scholarship to Acadia University valued at $8,000.
Callum Peter Allen Gillis – Principal’s List.
Abbey Danielle Gladwin – First Class Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to University of Ottawa valued at $12,000, the Chemistry 12 subject prize and the Pictou Local NSTU award valued at $100. She was also the recipient of the Roderick MacGregor Bursary valued at $250.
Brennan Robert Goswell – Principal’s List.
Erica Marie Greenlaw – Principal’s List.
Cody Henry Mitchell Haas – Honours; an entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University valued at $1,500, an entrance bursary valued at $5,600 and the Albion Mines Scholarship valued at $1,000.
Kevin Patrick Haines, recipient of the Co-operative Education 12 CEP subject prize.
Andrew Ryan Halliday – Principal’s List; recipient of the North Nova Staff Bursary valued at $100.
Nicholas Rownan Hardwick – Honours.
Chayla Jane Heath – Honours – French Immersion; recipient of the Thomas R.G. Rogers Memorial Royal Canadian Legion Bursary valued at $800.
Silent Eagle Herney – Honours; the Kirk Taylor Memorial Bursary valued at $250 and the Commercial Food Preparation 12 CEP subject prize.
Anna Grace Hicks – Principal’s List.
Nicholas Corey Higgs – First Class Honours; entrance scholarship to the University of Toronto valued at $2,000 and a Faculty of Music scholarship valued at $2,400. He was also the recipient of the Ron O’Flaherty Scholar-Athlete award valued at $750, the Nova Scotia Talent Trust Scholarship valued at $2,000, the renewable Irving Oil Scholarship valued at $8,000 over four years, the Doris Helen MacBain Hird Award for excellence valued at $500, the New Glasgow High School Class of ’56 Scholarship valued at $500 and the North Nova Music Auxiliary Award valued at $500. Nick has also been awarded the English 12 and Music Vocals 12 subject prizes.
Gerald James Holle – Honours; entrance scholarship to Acadia University $1,300.
Shelby Lane Hughes – Honours.
Dylan Tanner James – Principal’s List.
Corbin Bree Jenkins – Principal’s List; the High Crest Home New Glasgow Bursary valued at $500.
Brianna Bobbi Jobe – Honours; a Nova Scotia Freemason’s Albion Lodge #5 Bursary valued at $1,000 and the Glen Haven Manor Attendance award valued at $500.
Regan Anne Keay – First Class Honours; the D & R Sobeys Atlantic Scholarship valued at $78,000; the Margaret Cameron Bursary, the Leadership 12 subject prize and the Bergengren Credit Union Scholarship valued at $750. She is also the recipient of the Roderick MacGregor Bursary valued at $250.
Justin Anthony Kellock – Principal’s List; the Audio Recording Production 12 subject prize.
Patrick Wayne Kennedy – Principal’s List; the Derek Kearley Memorial Bursary valued at $500 and the Math For the Workplace 12 subject prize.
Timothy Todd Alan Klein – Principal’s List – French Immersion.
Bailey Brianna Koehoorn – First Class Honours; a Nova Scotia Freemason’s Albion Lodge #5 Bursary valued at $1,000 and the Pictou Local NSTU prize valued at $400.
Stephanie Rae-Anne Lamey – Honours – French Immersion; the MacGillivray Law Scholarship valued at $5,000.
Rycha Jane Levy – Principal’s List; a Chignecto East Regional Science Fair Scholarship valued at $1,500.
Keenan Douglas Linehan – Honours; the Nova Scotia Teachers’ Union – Pictou Local Education Bursary valued at $500; the Spectra Energy Scholarship valued at $20,000 over four years.
Sarah Marion Livingston – Honours – French Immersion; the Dr. Caroline Carmichael Chapter IODE Prize valued at $100.
Brittany Nicole Lodge – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University of $16,000 over four years. She has also been awarded the EF Tours Scholarship valued at $5,000, and the Visual Art 11 and Dance 12 subject prizes.
Keeley Elizabeth MacCuish – Honours; the New Glasgow Bombers Club Bursary valued at $200.
Branden Edwin MacDonald, the St. Ann’s Catholic Church Bursary valued at $100.
Devan Wayne MacDonald – Honours; an entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $5,000 over four years. He is also the recipient of an East Pictou Educational Foundation Bursary valued at $500, the Kin Canada Hal Rogers Bursary valued at $1,000 and the Sir Frederick Banting IODE Chapter prize valued at $500.
Jessy Nicole MacDonald – Principal’s List; an entrance scholarship to University of Prince Edward Island valued at $500 and the Evelyn Bannerman Memorial Bursary valued at $200.
Mark Anthony MacDonald – Honours; entrance scholarship to Acadia University.
Megan Margaret Irene MacDonald – Honours; entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University valued at $750; an East Pictou Educational Foundation Bursary valued at $500 and the MacDonald Family Memorial Bursary valued at $300.
Robyn Carley MacDonald – Honours; an entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $7,000 over four years.
Rylee Ann MacDonald – Honours; an entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University valued at $1,500.
Sydney May MacDonald – First Class Honours; Merit Scholarship valued at $12,000 over four years. She has also been awarded the Danny MacLeod Memorial Award valued at $200, the Nova Scotia/Nunavut Command Royal Canadian Legion bursary valued at $500, the Valedictorian Medal, the Arthur Allister MacBain Award for Excellence valued at $500 and the Arnold G. Jones Bursary donated by the Nova Scotia Association of Realtors valued at $3,257.
Tapanga Marie MacDonald – Principal’s List
Connor Bruce Fraser MacDougall – Principal’s List.
Robert Kieran MacGillivray – Honours; the Physical Education Leadership 12 subject prize.
Hilary Nicole MacInnis – First Class Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship St. F.X. University valued at $12,000 over four years. She is also the recipient of the Peter S. Demetre Scholarship valued at $2,000, the Grant Thornton Chartered Accountants Award valued at $300, the Principal’s Watch, the Centennial Award valued at $100, the Pictou Local NSTU award valued at $100 and the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #29 Trenton Bursary valued at $800.
Andrew David MacIvor – Honours.
Maria Lane MacIvor – Honours; the Larry Swenson Enterprises Limited Award valued at $100.
Jake Michael MacKinnon – Principal’s List.
Benjamin Stuart Peter MacLean – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $7,000 over four years, a renewable Harrison McCain Scholarship of $16,000 over four years, the Lawrence Burke Memorial Scholarship valued at $500, and a Nova Scotia Freemason’s Albion Lodge #5 Bursary valued at $1,000. He is also the recipient of the Sir Frederick Banting IODE Bursary valued at $500, the Keegan Lucas Memorial Bursary valued at $250, and the Municipal Council Bursary valued at $200.
Crystal Olisha Dawn MacLean – Honours; the Connors Transfer Ltd. Unsung Hero Award valued at $250, the Sociology 12 CEP, and the Dining Guest Services 12 CEP subject prizes.
Matthew Roderick MacLean – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University valued at $7,000 over four years.
Eric Randall MacLeod – Honours; the James A. MacBain Memorial Award valued at $500.
Rochelle Victoria MacLeod – Honours; a $1,000 entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University – Agricultural Campus and the Don Deagle Memorial Scholarship valued at $500.
Emma Lee MacNeil – Honours – French Immersion; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Mary’s University valued at $4,000 over four years, the RBC award valued at $1,000, the Pictou Local NSTU award valued at $100, the Commercial Food Preparation 12 subject prize and the Community Roots bursary valued at $300.
Katelynn Marilynn Rose MacPhee – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier of $5,000 over four years, the Willie Tracey Award for Perseverance valued at $500, the Co-operative Education 12 subject prize and the New Glasgow High School Grad Class 1998 prize.
Briea Rose Malloy – Honours; a full tuition President’s scholarship to St. Thomas University valued at $23,500 over four years. She is also the recipient of the Francais Immersion 12 and the Advanced Placement 12 English subject prizes.
Thomas Reilly Mason – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University valued at $5,000 over four years. He is also the recipient of the Film and Video Production 12 subject prize.
Jamie Marie McCarron – First Class Honours – French Immersion; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University valued at $7,000 over four years and the Pictou Local NSTU award valued at $100.
Jaclyn Anne McGean – Honours.
Madison Elizabeth McGuire – Honours – French Immersion; a renewable entrance scholarship to University of Ottawa valued at $8,000 over four years and the Geographie Planetaire 12 subject prize and the Northern Nova United Soccer Club Bursary valued at $100.
Keith Earl McInnis – Principal’s List; the Global Geography 12 CEP and English Communications 12 CEP subject prizes.
Chandler Cheyenne Miller – Principal’s List.
Samuel Malcolm Moore – Honours.
Sarah Jane Munroe – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Mary’s University valued at $4,000 over four years and the Sobey’s Bursary valued at $200.
Shelby Paige Munroe – Honours.
Gabrielle Min Murray – Principal’s List.
Hailey Fawn Murray – Principal’s List – French Immersion; the Dr. Caroline Carmichael Chapter IODE Prize valued at $100.
Stephanie Elizabeth-Marie Nesbitt – Principal’s List.
Thomas Grant Nicholson – Principal’s List; the Stellarton Lions Club Bursary Award valued at $200 and the Big Al’s Convenience Store Bursary valued at $500.
Anthony Brady Michael O’Neil – Principal’s List.
Damien Lee Odo; the Auto Maintenance 12 subject prize.
Ashlee Michelle Parker – Honours – French Immersion; a renewable entrance scholarship to the University of Ottawa valued at $8,000 over four years.
Taylor Eve Perry – Principal’s List; the Town of Trenton Bursary in memory of Linda Pellerine valued at $100 and the Core French 12 subject prize.
Erica Katherine Pirnie – Principal’s List; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $5,000 over four years.
Breton Liam Potter – Honours; a Municipal Council Bursary valued at $200.
Taylor Edwin Publicover – Principal’s List; the Connors Transfer Limited Unsung Hero award valued at $250.
Brett Arthur Quinn – Principal’s List; the New Glasgow Regional Police Association Local #103 Award valued at $300.
Monica Paige Rivers – First Class Honours; a Nova Scotia Freemason’s – Albion #5 Bursary valued at $1,000, the Ernest “Dutchie” McCharles Bursary valued at $100, the Leil Bursary in memory of James and Laura Leil valued at $300 and the Global Geography 12 and Geology 12 subject prizes. She is also the recipient of a Nova Scotia Community College Entrance Award valued at $3,130.
Julian Alton Robertson – Honours; the James Roy Award valued at $115 and the Robert Spencer Memorial Bursary valued at $1,500.
Colby John Robert Russell – Principal’s List; a Nova Scotia Community College Entrance Award valued at $3,130.
Caitlyn Christine Sandluck – Honours; the Gary Kennedy Memorial Bursary valued at $500, a Nova Scotia Teachers’ Union – Pictou Local Education Bursary valued at $500, the Phyllis McDermid Memorial Scholarship valued at $500 and a Municipal Council Bursary valued at $200.
Shaila Dawn Sartoris – Principal’s List – French Immersion.
Hope Anne Marie Sears – Honours.
Iain Alexander Fraser Sellers – Honours – French Immersion; a renewable scholarship to University of Ottawa of $4,000, the Pepsi Bottling Group Limited Bursary valued at $100 and the Law 12 subject prize.
Joshua James Sheppard – Principal’s List.
Kayla Christena Simpson – Principal’s List.
Haley Breanne Smith – Honours.
Julie Lynn Smith – Principal’s List.
Curtis James Snyder – Principal’s List.
Emma Lindsay Spaulding – Honours – French Immersion; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Mary’s University valued at $4,000 over four years. She is also the recipient of the Highland Auto Bursary valued at $500.
Kelsey LeeAnn Stevens – Principal’s List.
Caroline Anne Marie Straub – First Class Honours; a $1,500 entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University. She is also the recipient of the Fraser and Hoyt Good Citizenship award valued at $250, the Churchville Women’s Institute Memorial Bursary valued at $200, the Global History 12 subject prize, and the Making a Difference Award valued at $250.
Hilary Earline Taylor – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $5,000 over four years, the AA Munro NSFMHL Top Student-Athlete Scholarship and the Colin B MacGillivary Athletic/Academic Award valued at $1,000.
Rebecca Anne Taylor – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $5,000 over four years.
Chase Bradley Thomsen – Principal’s List.
Paige Elizabeth Turnbull – Honours; the New Glasgow High School Grad Class of 1995 prize.
Victoria Brynn Vassallo – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Mary’s University valued at $3,500 over four years.
Megan Elizabeth Weeks – Honours; the African Canadian Studies 11 subject prize.
Brandon Clifford Welsh – Principal’s List.
Riley Thomas Joseph White – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to St. Francis Xavier University of $5,000 over four years.
Hannah Christine Williams – First Class Honours; the Confederation Blue Merit Scholarship valued at $20,000 over four years, the East Pictou Educational Foundation bursary valued at $500, the Nova Scotia Nurses’ Union Scholarship valued at $500, the No More Westrays Bursary valued at $500, and the Bergengren Credit Union Scholarship valued at $750. She is also the recipient of the Business Technology 11 subject prize.
Robert Scott Young – First Class Honours; a $1,500 entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University, the IOOF Union Lodge #30 Springville Bursary valued at $100, the MR Murchison Memorial Bursary in Biology, the Municipal Council Bursary valued at $200, the Leil Bursary in memory of Norman and Janette Leil valued at $300 and the Harley Kellock Memorial Science Bursary valued at $500.
Jessica Elizabeth Zentner – Honours; a renewable entrance scholarship to Dalhousie University of $20,000 over four years, Chartwell’s Outstanding Achievement Award valued at $100 and the Kinette Bursary for Community Spirit valued at $500.

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Summer Sounds starting this week at deCoste

PICTOU—The Festival of Summer Sounds begins July 2 at the deCoste Centre, featuring 24 nights of music, song and great traditional music. Different performers each week, from Scotland, Ireland and across Canada, will be featured in concerts, ceilidhs and dinner theatre.
Breabach, a dynamic young group from Scotland, starts off the Festival on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. offering a unique brand of contemporary folk music. The family group ‘Everything Fitz’ from Ontario will be onstage July 7 and 8 playing everything from bluegrass to jazz to traditional jigs and reels with choreographed dance routines. Saltwater In Your Socks, a lobster dinner theatre experience, is on July 9 beginning at 7 p.m.
Celtic Ladies 1, featuring Karen Corbin, Carmel Mikol, Gillian Boucher and Mary Beth Carty, will take the stage July 14- 16 with traditional tunes and songs. The Ships of 1801 Society presents ‘The Year of the Burning’, the third concert in the trilogy on July 19. Musical Families, with Tony & Shannon Quinn, Alycia and Robert Putnam, and Ann & Bruce Holton, are shining examples of the musical traditional shared by generations and perform July 21-23. The Ballagh Bunch, another musical family from Ontario will be on stage July 28-30 with their mix of songs, tunes and traditional step dancing.
The Cape Breton Summertime Revue—The Next Generation opens the month of August on the 5th, followed by Terry Kelly in concert on August 6. Runa, an Irish folk group, will perform August 11 and 12, followed by Starb’ard Side, a group from Lunenburg on the 13th. Celtic Ladies 2, with Cassie & Maggie, Ellen Gibling & Erin Dempsey, and Patricia Murray are onstage August 18-20. A children’s event, Alexander & the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, will be presented August 21 at 6 p.m. Summer Sounds Alumni, with Jimmy Sweeney, Ardyth & Jennifer and John Spyder Macdonald, stalwarts of the Festival, perform August 25-27. The summer season closes with a performance by Men of the Deeps on August 29.
Tickets and further information on all summer programming is available on line at www.decostecentre.ca.

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Gloryhound Jubilee-bound

Gloryhound – the leatherclad champions of straight up rock – will be returning to the Jubilee mainstage. The band last rocked the riverfront in 2013.
Fresh off a tour with Theory of a Deadman, the WT Fest and Canadian Music Week, how does it feel to be headed back to New Glasgow?
“Good. It means they like us,” said the band’s vocalist and rhythm guitarist Evan Meisner. “It always feels good to be liked. Last time we played it was one of my favourite festivals in the Maritimes. It was a really good show. I wanted to come back. Getting invited back feels good, we’re really excited to play the stage again.”
Between Jubilees, the band recorded their first full length album, Loaded Gun, in Vancouver with producer GGGarth Richardson with producer Bob Ezrin (Pink Floyd, Alice Cooper) at the mixing desk.
The phrase “loaded gun” actually crops up twice on the album, in the title track and later in ‘Set it on Fire’. Questioned on the repetition of the phrase, Meisner entertained some lyrical analysis with good humour and a bit of cryptic, yet welcoming Atlantic sarcasm.
“We’re not like in the NRA or anything,” Meisner said. “We’re not big gun guys, we don’t go hunting on the weekends. None of us even own a gun. I said that like everyone’s supposed to? I think it was just an accident more so than anything.
“’Cause I’m one of those dumb writers who will use the same lyric a bunch and realize it after the fact and have to go back and change it. But with ‘loaded gun’ when I realized it was also on ‘Set it on Fire’ I was like ‘ugh, I don’t really care.’ ‘Set it on Fire’ was written way beforehand. I just thought it was a cool lyric and a really great metaphor,” Meisner continued.
“And then we thought we should use it again because it’s such a socially acceptable word, we might as well name the whole record after it,” Meisner said, with more than a hint of irony.
“You might want to say this is a concept record about loaded guns,” said Meisner. “But then you might also not want to say that because it wasn’t.”
What Loaded Gun is, rather than a concept album on unsafe firearm storage practices, is straight, distilled 70s flavoured heavy rock – humbuckers and tubes hitting speakers at full force.
“The best thing we’ve got going for us is our live show,” Meisner said. “I think we’ve spent a long time trying to capture that magic in the studio and it seems like the fancier stuff we use the further we get from what we do on stage and the further we get from giving people that payoff.”
Overdubs and multiple parts were kept to a minimum, both to replicate the band’s live sound, but also in turn to make it possible to replicate the album live. Too many parts and guitars on the record would mean the need for too many guys on stage.
“It was fine for the Beatles, they didn’t have to tour. We do.”
That MO of keeping things simple seemed to sit well with the man who mixed the album, Bob Ezrin. If the name isn’t immediately familiar to you, you know in Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick in the Wall” when kids sing the second verse? That was Ezrin’s idea. Same for “School’s Out” by Alice Cooper.
“He shared a couple of stories,” Meisner said, “probably stories you can’t print in your paper… I heard a story about… no, I can’t tell that one either.”
Mostly the band worked with Ezrin via phone but their meeting with him was memorable.
“It’s a funny story. We were working on this song on the bridge part,” Meisner recalled, “and it was one of those things where the song is fast, lots of energy to it and then it cuts down to half time for the whole bridge part. It was kind of a cool riff but it killed the momentum. We were still believing in it and that’s when Bob came in. He was rocking out, bobbing his head along and it came to the bridge and he goes ‘Oh, I hate it. It totally kills the song! The song is cool up until that point and then it just got lame.’ It was harsh, but I can see where he was coming from.”
Meisner said the band took Ezrin’s… advice… to heart and worked out a new part. Loaded Gun has many things happening in its 11 tracks but a lame bridge is not one of them.
Gloryhound will be playing at the New Glasgow Riverfront Jubilee Friday night.

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Sean Fraser seeking Liberal candidacy

MERIGOMISH – Sean Fraser, a lawyer from Pictou County, is seeking the nomination to run as the candidate for the Liberal Party of Canada in his home riding of Central Nova.
Fraser, who grew up in Merigomish, has experience working as a member of the litigation and international dispute resolution practice groups with Canada’s top-ranked law firm. He also serves as an Associate Research Fellow with the Centre for International Sustainable Development Law.
“I am committed to serving as an advocate for the people of Central Nova in Ottawa and am focused on creating the economic conditions that will help retain and attract young people and families to the province and region,” said Fraser.
“I am passionate about bringing change to the top-down style of partisan governance in Ottawa by focusing my efforts on the citizen engagement and empowerment initiatives of the Liberal Party of Canada.”
Fraser spent time working to promote access to information laws with a human rights organization in Johannesburg, South Africa.
He holds a Master’s degree in public international law from Leiden University’s Advanced Studies program in the Netherlands, where he specialized in peace, justice and development. He also holds a law degree from Dalhousie University and a Bachelor of Science from St. Francis Xavier, where he graduated with distinction.
He has a long history of volunteering and has contributed to a series of written legal publications and papers. The former member of the Stellarton Balmoral Pipe Band has been playing the bagpipes for 22 years.
Fraser is married to Sarah Burton, a civil liberties lawyer from New Glasgow. His five sisters and parents, John and Sally Fraser, are all graduates of St. Francis Xavier University.
“This is a very exciting time for change for our region and I’m looking to the Liberals in Central Nova to come out and show their support for my nomination.”

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Education offers a brighter future

To the Editor:
He battled bacterial meningitis, four strokes and, three years later, graduated with a welding diploma from Nova Scotia Community College. Joe Miller, whose faculty member described him as dedicated and persistent, was one of over 4,500 graduates to cross our convocation stages in June.
Joe’s story is exceptional and an example to others of what can be achieved with such steely determination.
Each individual has their own inspiring story of challenges faced, overcome and left behind in the wake of seeking and securing a brighter future. Mothers graduating with daughters. Fathers graduating with sons. Parents watching the first in their family receive a post-secondary designation. Others adding to a university degree with a diploma. The prevailing sentiment is that education offers a better quality of life, a brighter future for themselves, their family and communities.
Iretia Cox, 73-year-old graduate of the Adult Learning Program, says she is just starting. With her high school diploma in hand, along with the Dean’s Award for overcoming challenges and inspiring staff and students, she is set to study business administration this fall.
Burridge Campus valedictorian Whitney Middleton said, “You’re never too young or old to start something new and become the very best you.” I could not imagine a better convocation theme. It is a time to celebrate a milestone in what is hopefully a life-long educational journey.
Congratulations Class of 2015!
Don Bureaux
NSCC President

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A united municipality would have a louder voice

To the Editor:
There is currently a major effort underway to amalgamate the County of Pictou with the towns of Pictou, New Glasgow, Stellarton, Trenton and Westville.
If this were to happen we would be the third largest municipality in the province behind HRM and the Municipality of Cape Breton.
Perhaps, too, if this were to happen and we were to speak with one voice, our provincial government might be more inclined to negotiate with River John about their proposal to create a hub school. A single united municipality of Pictou will have a much more powerful voice in this and so many other issues.
Bob Naylor
Pictou

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Fashionable people doing questionable things

To the Editor:
Today, my husband and I attended the rally to save the River John School, at the Provincial Legislature. As my husband remarked on our way home, “We saw everybody and it wasn’t even a funeral.” It might as well have been, as far as rural Nova Scotia goes.
Driving back from an appointment later in the day, the line of a popular song, “fashionable people, doing questionable things” struck a chord with me, and I thought that political people doing questionable things would be more apt to describe what has gone on in this province for a very long time. The list of my impressions is as follows:
1. Back in the day of John Buchanan’s government an elementary school was built in Scotsburn, as a sop to the Scotsburn Co-op, so that a new sewer system could be constructed to help their expansion. Children were taken from the River John catchment area to fill up that school, although there was an existing school a few minutes away in Lyons Brook. Where is the Co-op head office now?
2. The ‘Wellness’ Centre, which is of no use to most residents of the county, was constructed. If they don’t live too far away to use it, they can’t afford to. Apparently a senior administrator of the school board was on the steering committee, and should have known that other facilities would suffer as a result of this fiasco, educational ones included. The gym of the River John School was being used by the public, and I am sure there was not a $900,000 annual shortfall involved. I guess, like the Scotsburn school, the history of pandering to certain special interest groups repeats in Pictou County. If what was billed at the time as the biggest ever draw to employment couldn’t even bring the RBC jobs to Pictou County (they are situated in Bedford), what was the point? I hear that a new library is planned for the Town of Pictou, I hope they will stock the old classic children’s story, The Emperor’s New Clothes.
3. There is also a trend of individuals, who represent themselves as being from Pictou County, attending the World/Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. One only has to look around at the economy of Pictou County to question the credentials of those attendees and wonder how they have not been banned from the event. Much more of their input, and I am sure the world economy will grind to a halt!
4. The ongoing farcical process of competitions being held to identify new ideas for development. Where is the hay burning stove, developed by LST? Instead of a few windmills coming out of Trenton Works, there could have been a ground breaking product. People would have been able to sustain their own heating requirements, not have to depend on a charitable fuel fund. The old process of, you give me an award, and I’ll give you an award, and we’ll see how much tax money gets thrown at us, continues. Make sure to get the photos in The Advocate though.
5. The last one is the nauseating habit local political types have of attending every barbecue, lobster supper, etc. during the summer months, as if it were a big favour to the electorate. If we didn’t see you today at the Legislature, why would we want to see you at a chicken barbecue? Were you too busy hobnobbing at a paid board of directors meeting or working for the MOU?
As stated, these are just a few of my own observations. I am sure many will disagree, else why do the same types keep being elected? I wondered today why more people, who are only part-time residents such as ourselves, did not come down in support. If the community withers, the other services they rely on such as fire protection, policing, along with everything else will disappear.
If only for selfish reasons, Town of Pictou residents should have rallied to support us. After all, I am sure Pictou Academy is next on the chopping block. The drive from Pictou town to Northumberland Regional High School must be much shorter than the one from River John to a different school. And, as stated by a former Sobeys executive, the P3 schools are the best thing to ever happen to Pictou County. Oddly, though, Rothesay Collegiate has a building named after a Sobey.
Hey, maybe they can endow the River John School!
I fear the Ivany Report is turning out to be a waste of paper.
Elizabeth Baillie
Timberlea/Cape John

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Doubts join Canada Day

Today, we celebrate Canada’s birthday, while clouds hang over it.
Backward weather is adversely affecting our growing season. While the forecast called for fair weather and seasonable temperatures, there was little of it in June.
We are witnessing an everlasting political campaign season that’s directed toward a likely federal election this fall and a phenomenon of style trumping substance that cannot leave Canadians reassured.
Controversy has followed the questionable call to construct a 24-metre-high statue called Mother Canada that some say tarnishes the memory of those who served Canada in combat that it is meant to honour.
Residents in and around River John are despondent that their shuttered Primary to Grade 9 school will never reopen and their prototype of a hub community school model is doomed – there, and everywhere.
Out of all this, the human spirit – hard as it might be to detect – does shine through. Monday’s grey skies did disappear and gave the hope of warmer weather, as the sun broke clear.
Graduates from Pictou Academy and North Nova Education Centre on Friday and Northumberland Regional High School on Monday marked the end of a school year that signals for them a new chapter in their lives as they pursue their dreams and approach adulthood and all its attending responsibilities at the same time.
There has been the anticipation of the long-standing Canada Day celebrations in Westville, the first of a series of summer festivals in Pictou County.
Runners and walkers alike prepared to enter the Run for the Lobster on Sunday in Pictou. A quirk in the calendar once again made the five-kilometre and 10-kilometre races the official start of the annual Pictou Lobster Carnival, with a host of events leading to the actual festival which runs from July 10 to 12.
The carnival is designed to celebrate the spring lobster catch that this year started in uncertain weather in May, which prompted a decision to extend fishing to Sunday to make up for the delay.
There is a call for us to overcome all the travails that are visiting Canada Day this year.
We need to remind ourselves that Canada is not easy, that democracy is not easy. We need to want it badly enough to become engaged and stay engaged in the civic process that affects our lives every day. We may not notice it all the time, but none of us can afford to ignore it. Equality of rights and the will of the people are not mere catchphrases. They reflect the pulse of the country and its many and varied communities.
We are called to pay tribute to our country’s birthday with a clear and active mind and keep lit the candles of hope.

Steve Goodwin

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The Flash actor eyed For Harry Potter spin-off?

Warner Bros. is eying more actors for the 2016 Harry Potter spin-off prequel, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, and their next casting may becoming in a flash.
Ezra Miller, the actor who will appear in this year’s The Stanford Prison Experiment as well as 2017′s Justice League and 2018′s The Flash playing Barry Allen, may be up for a Harry Potter role.
Variety reports the casting, though don’t say how close Ezra Miller may be to signing a deal to be cast for the role. Miller would be up for the role of Kredan, and not much is known about him other than he’s a character who accompanies Newt on his adventures.
Set in New York seven decades before the Harry Potter movies start, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is based on the Hogwarts textbook of the same name and follows the adventures of its author, Newt Scamander played by Eddie Redmayne.
Scamander is a “magiczoologist,” which in the “Harry Potter” realm is a person who studies magical creatures. Aside from Scamander, four other main roles are looking to be cast. Two American girls and two American boys.
If you were unaware, JK Rowling is working on a Harry Potter sequel, set to debut as a play. It will begin its West End theatrical run in summer 2016, and will be titled Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. And don’t worry fans – she may be JK but she is not, JK.
In case you want to look at Ezra Miller’s acting, whether to judge his possible casting in Fantastic Beasts or his casting as The Flash, I’d recommend Perks of Being a Wallflower or this summer’s The Stanford Prison Experiment coming July 17 where he’ll star along side Tye Sheridan who will play Cyclops in X-Men Apocalypse.
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them will also star Eddie Redmayne from The Theory of Everything and Katherine Waterson from Inherent Vice. It will be released on November 18, 2016.

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Heritage Trust keeping eye on historical buildings, sites

BRIDGEVILLE – Preserving heritage is important to John Ashton, who says he appreciates the work the Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia is doing to tour historical sites in Pictou County and elsewhere in the province.
“The Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia is a great group of dedicated volunteers who have the entire province’s heritage and history in their sites,” said Ashton, a local artist and historian. “The group uses a common sense approach to build heritage, where reality meets vision.”
Ashton is Nova Scotia’s representative on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. He cited the old post office in Pictou County as an example of the trust’s work.
“Even though some buildings and historical sites seem derelict and forgotten, there is quite a bit of behind the scenes activity happening,” he said. “The HTNS’s involvement plays very well in my role as Nova Scotia representative on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, where we as HTNS regional representatives report on heritage and history activities and issues in our Nova Scotia regions. In return, I have the opportunity to report to the Historical Sites and Monuments Board and to other provinces throughout Canada, historical and heritage issues relating to our province. It is certainly a great honour to serve on both boards.”
The Heritage Trust of Nova Scotia is an all-volunteer, non-government, not-for-profit society. It was founded in 1959 to save an outstanding Georgian house from demolition. As the oldest heritage advocacy group in Canada, the trust has been involved in a wide variety of advocacy issues, research and education projects.
Past heritage trust board chairperson Linda Forbes said she is well aware of buildings and sites of historic significance in Pictou County. She recently visited Pictou to update some of them first-hand during the trust’s recent board meeting. Each May, the trust meets around the province instead of its usual venue in Halifax.
Her visit included Peggy Carson’s house and nearby foundry on Front Street in Pictou.
“We enjoyed it,” she said. “It allows board members to hear from people, their successes and challenges.”
The trust identifies and acts on important provincial heritage issues through demonstration projects and by advocating preservation policies and decisions in legislative, judicial, administrative and private forums.
“The trust has a province-wide mandate to work to protect sites of historic or archaeological significance,” she said.
Monthly lectures, special workshops, tours, publications, a quarterly magazine, The Griffin, and research projects, encourage Nova Scotians to document and preserves the province’s unique architectural heritage.
Forbes praised Ashton’s work in researching and sharing his knowledge of the history of buildings, sites and communities.
“What is done by regional representatives varies with the connections and personalities,” she said. “John is very energetic.”

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Board makes cuts to achieve balanced budget

STELLARTON – Cuts in various areas of the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board have been made to balance for the next fiscal year.
The board approved a budget of $202 million for the 2015-2016 school year at a special meeting on June 23, that includes $7.6 million in provincial revenue for targeted initiatives.
“It’s a good budget,” said Ron Marks, who represents Stellarton and Westville on the school board and chairs its financial services committee. “It took a long time to form it, but I feel we have put the dollars we have in all the right places.”
The provincial funding is for continuation of the Grade Primary-to-2 class cap of 20 students and a class cap of 25 students for grades 3 and 4.
The allocation also continues student support grants for all schools, increases the number of reading recovery teachers and includes more funding for mathematics support.
The board’s deliberations over closing schools in River John, Maitland and Wentworth delayed the budget. It also triggered decisions on where to reduce a $3.32 million budget deficit.
After passing motions to close each of the schools at its regular meeting on June 10, the board was able to invest $900,000 back into the budget to reduce its deficit to $2.42 million.
It absorbed the remaining deficit by reducing $111,000 from bus routes, reducing $193,500 by dropping 5.5 full-time equivalent bus driver and custodial positions, taking off $18,500 from education services, saving $1.8 million by eliminating 36.1 full-time equivalent Nova Scotia Teacher’s Union positions and cutting $25,000 from administration costs.
The reduction is actually 17 positions due to the high number of retirements this year.
Marks said the savings in bussing and teachers reflects declining enrolment. The region has 433 fewer students in its system this year.
“Every year, (the operations services department) looks at the routes where we have fewer students,” he said. “They put routes together to save fuel and increase bus load. All the bus routes will be less than an hour, except in special cases.”
The board also found savings by reducing its major maintenance budget by $131,000. However, Pictou West representative Vivian Farrell noted that some of the savings were due to tangible capital asset grants that the McNeil government introduced in this year’s budget for special maintenance.
Work will be done at Pictou Academy, Frank H. MacDonald and Dr. W.A. MacLeod under the program.
“That’s quite a key thing for maintenance,” she said.
Marks said middle school library staff hours were cut in order to prevent job cuts.
“That was the position of the board to preserve as many as we could,” he said.

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SOS group not giving up on River John school

The River John SOS group may be down, but they are by no means out.
Last Saturday saw a Peaceful Protest carried out in Tatamagouche by the group, as they refuse to give up on their school, and more importantly, their kids.
“We’re being let down by the so called system,” said one long-term group member.
“The process has been questionable, on many levels.”
But all that seems to have done is spur the members on. As they raised their signs, passersby slowed and honked in support of the group, as they lined Main Street, just above the Creamery Square, where many local politicians were gathered for another event.
“It’s been suggested we go down” another member said. “But this isn’t about disrupting that event. It’s about supporting this cause.”
And while they are brimming with public support, it seems to stop there.
“Premier McNeil did agree to meet with us, but also said that he won’t be changing his mind.”
And North Colchester MLA/Minister of Education, Karen Casey, has also been essentially persona non grata to the group.
And that doesn’t dampen a single spirit.
“We haven’t given up. Not yet.”

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Pristine Kids newest venture of online fundraising platform

EDITOR’S NOTE: This article is a part of a new segment featuring fundraising campaigns in Pictou County that use the online platform of www.gofundme.com to raise money for a variety of different causes. If you know of a campaign that you would like to have featured in this series email heatherbrimicombe@pictouadvocate.com.

If you think back to being about 10 or 11, allowance money was a precious thing. Chore money was earned and saved for the things you wanted most.
For kids who want to skateboard, a proper deck and all the fittings can be a big investment, with a professional board ranging from about $100 plus.
A local skateboarding startup has taken up the cause of helping kids who are interested in skateboarding.
Pristine Skateboarding, which began in February of this year by some Pictou County locals, has started a fundraising campaign to provide kids ages 15 and under with professional skateboards to promote the sport and physical activity for kids who may not be able to afford a proper board otherwise.
“It was just an idea I got…Kids can’t get a job, they’re too young,” said Brandon Richardson, one of the founders of Pristine Skateboarding. “So how can we help them?”
After discussions with HAF skateboarding shop and agreeing to put in their own skateboard decks at cost, Pristine founded Pristine Kids.
Richardson said that in the last few years, he has noticed a growth in the Pictou County skateboarding community, as well as noticing that some of the younger kids are using skateboards from department stores or other places, that may not be up to the calibre of boarding they are hoping to do.
“You can break a board so easily, it’s just a piece of wood,” said Richardson. “To go to a shop and spend 70 or 80 bucks on even just a deck when you’re 10 years old, it takes a year to do that kind of thing.”
After rounding up funding for the project, which is being crowd sourced, the organization will purchase professional quality skateboards for kids 15 and under.
“The better we do the more we’ll hand out,” said Richardson.
So far, Pristine Skateboarding has been promoting the initiative on their Facebook page, Pristine Skateboarding, as well as collecting funding via a Go Fund Me page.
To donate to the cause, visit http://www.gofundme.com/PristineKids or donate using Paypal by sending a “gift” to pristineskateboarding@outlook.com. Richardson also mentioned that those who are uncomfortable donating via the Internet can get in touch with him on Facebook.
According to Richardson, boards can range anywhere from $100 to $250 or more, so they are hoping to raise enough to give a few away.
“A lot of people are pumped,” said Richardson about feedback they have been receiving on the campaign so far. “If it goes well we want to do it as a continuous thing.”
Richardson hopes that along with promoting the sport itself, that getting kids interested in skateboarding will also help with personal development.
“I find skateboarding is such a mental therapy; it’s helped me through a lot so if it can help me it can help kids, it can help anybody,” said Richardson. “It can help them help themselves.”

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Strawberry growers hopeful for robust season

CARIBOU ISLAND – A harsh winter is slowly yielding to prime-time farming.
And that applies to the berry industry.
Alan and Gail Jankov are hoping for a decent recovery from the winter that has left some of their summer-bearing strawberry in less than good health. Others are in better shape.
Down the road from their home is a patch with summer-bearing strawberries that are still green but otherwise healthy.
Normally they would be ripening, but strawberries from the Annapolis Valley, the first ‘local’ berries to be seen here, have only recently surfaced at retail outlets there to augment berries imported from the U.S.
“It was a hard winter, and some of our customers may be disappointed, but some of our berries do look good,” Alan Jankov said.
He pointed to fall-bearing raspberry plants that are looking robust already.
“They start bearing fruit in September and keep producing it until the snow flies,” he said.
A successful season is always subject to weather.
“We have enough water, but we need more heat,” he said, of the less than balmy weather Pictou County has been experiencing lately.
Forecasts point to the backward spring weather and below normal temperatures so far this summer finally being followed by more seasonable weather to help stimulate the crops.

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Clean the Mill rep skeptical of air quality improvements

PICTOU – A member of the Clean the Mill group is questioning the province’s decision to authorize Northern Pulp to resume operations.
Matt Gunning says passages of the letter of authorization issued by the Department of Environment to Northern Pulp on June 25, after an inspection of the mill’s new electrostatic precipitator, are vague and imply that it could be early next year before the new machinery is fully effective in reducing air emissions.
The letter from Penny McLeod, district manager of the department’s compliance division who is based in the department’s Granton office, confirms the company “has met the terms and conditions for the startup and commissioning phase of the precipitator as outlined in the ministerial order issued May 28.”
While the department says the new precipitator is expected to reduce emissions at the mill, its press release laid out a commissioning phase where the new equipment is fine-tuned and expected to be finished by Oct. 16.
Once complete, the department says the mill must comply with new emission limits that will be 80 per cent less than those from the old precipitator, as outlined in the 2015 industrial approval.
Gunning said the commissioning could be sooner than Oct. 16, but it could be later in the year before testing is done and results are released to the public.
“It’s always good to see some movement, but I think people are tired of these extensions,” he said. “The wording used is extremely vague and allows for more extensions. We’re looking at 2016 before we know if this precipitator works.”
The order formalized requirements to restart production at Northern Pulp. The plant shut down operations on May 30.
The letter from McLeod mandates “appropriate measures” to minimize emissions during the commissioning phase. But Gunning questioned what that covers, such as burning black liquor in the recovery boiler once it resumes operation.
The mill’s start up has been ongoing through last week and is well on its way toward resuming full operations.
Communications manager Kathy Cloutier confirmed on Friday that mill operators began injecting liquor into the recovery boiler at 8 a.m. on Friday.
She said the mill is in full production.
“Going forward and keeping in mind that in these early days there is still fine tuning of equipment, typically this is what people can expect in terms of conditions and emissions,” she said.
Northern Pulp is still appealing parts of the agreement.

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The authors are coming, the authors are coming!

RIVER JOHN – Once again, the North Shore of Nova Scotia will welcome prominent Canadian authors for River John’s annual Read by the Sea literary festival.
The July 11 stellar lineup is made up of Linden MacIntyre, Isabel Huggan, Maureen Jennings and Giles Blunt as they explore the 2015 theme of “blood and soul.”
Toronto-based Jennings, who may be best-known for her books on which the popular Murdoch Mysteries television series is based – and where she is creative consultant, joins northern Ontario mystery writer Giles Blunt to examine the bloody side of human nature. They are expected to read from recent works: in Jennings’ case from No Known Grave, the third in her Tom Tyler mystery series and a 2015 Crime Writers of Canada nominee for Best Novel. Blunt co-authored several television screen plays including one for Law & Order, and wrote nine novels, the most recent being Until the Night. During his appearance at Read by the Sea he may give a preview of his next book, Hesitation Cut, which comes out this August.
MacIntyre, an award-winning television journalist and the 2009 Giller Prize winner for The Bishop’s Man, will approach the more soulful side of human relationships. His newest novel, Punishment, offers a tinge of the bloody side and is set in Cape Breton as are his previous two: The Bishop’s Man and Why Men Lie. He is joined on the “Soul” stage by Isabel Huggan, a Canadian author, editor and writing instructor who works from a writers’ retreat in France. She is author of the collections The Elizabeth Stories and You Never Know, and a memoir, Belonging: Home Away From Home.
Musicians Meaghan Smith and Jason Mingo will provide entertainment during the lunch hour. Coles book store of New Glasgow will sell books by the featured authors as well as by others from the River John area.
At critical points during the festival, “pop-up poets” will recite their own works or that of others – watch for them!
This is the 16th season for Read by the Sea, which has grown since 2000, its inaugural year, to include a children’s festival named WordPlay, held June 20 in Tatamagouche; as well as teen events, year-‘round readings, and book club sponsorships.
Read by the Sea is a non-profit event and admission is free.
The festival takes place at the River John Legion’s Memorial Gardens, with the River John Fire Hall as the rain venue. Previous announcements said it was River John Consolidated School but Chignecto Central Regional School Board will be locking the school doors on June 30, so the venue will no longer be available to Read by the Sea.
The event will begin at 11 a.m. and runs until 3:30 p.m. Patrons may bring picnic lunches to enjoy during the break or visit one of the local food concession stands.
Read by the Sea alumni include the following:
►2000: Alistair MacLeod, Sheldon Currie, Maureen Hull, Sheree Fitch
►2001: David Adams Richards, Donna Morrissey, George Elliott Clarke, Carol Bruneau, Deidre Kessler
►2002: Leo MacKay Jr., Lynn Coady, Anne Simpson, Herb Curtis, Anne Louise MacDonald
►2003: Margaret Atwood, Michael Crummey, Alfred Silver, Linda Little, Frances Wolfe, Mary-Jane Hampton
►2004: Ed Riche, Sue Goyette, Deborah Joy Corey, David Weale, Joanne Taylor, Janet MacNaughton
►2005: Herménégilde Chiasson, Beatrice MacNeil, Beth Powning, Michael Redhill, Lesley Choyce, Kristin Bieber Domm

Continued on page 3
Continued from page 2

►2006: Steven Heighton, Catherine Safer, Harry Thurston, Lisa Moore, Janet Lunn, Deborah Ellis
►2007: Don Hannah, Joan Clark, Freeman Patterson, Ami MacKay, Gary Blackwood, Pamela Hickman, Mark Oakley
►2008: Camilla Gibb, Cynthia Thayer, Don McKay, Daniel MacIvor, Budge Wilson, Susan Tooke, Raquel Rivera
►2009: Wayson Choy, Don Domanski, Shani Mootoo, Eleanor Wachtel, Kathleen Martin-James, Shane Peacock, Leo Yerxa
►2010: Catherine Banks, Austin Clarke, Kenneth J. Harvey, Helen Humphreys, Shauntay Grant, Kit Pearson
►2011: Shandi Mitchell, Johanna Skibsrud, Alexander MacLeod, Richard B. Wright, Jill MacLean, Frieda Wishinsky
►2012: Rawi Hage, Madeleine Thein, Julia MacCarthy, Silver Donald Cameron, Philip Roy, Don Aker, Kathy Kaulbach
►2013: Vincent Lam, Marina Endicott, Rebecca Silver Slayter, Phil Hall, Jan Coates, Vicki Grant, Jacqueline Halsey
► 2014: Guy Vanderhaeghe, Steven Galloway, Frank MacDonald, Sylvia Hamilton, Sharon Butela

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